Parliament discusses new cybercrime law



A leaked draft of a new cyber law has triggered fears of increased censorship and restrictions to online privacy. Similar to existing press laws, the proposed law would limit free expression “when it comes to offending the King or the Monarchy, Islam, Morocco Territorial Integrity, public order, homeland security, necessities of public service, or public policy.” Article 54 holds online service providers responsible for user-generated content, with punishments ranging from one month to a year imprisonment and fines of up to 100,000 dirham (roughly $12,300 USD). Authorities would have the power to block “offending websites” that are perceived as “inconsistent with the public political beliefs” under Article 73. Impersonating someone or using their information or image online without permission would be prohibited, but authorities would be authorized to participate in online conversations without identifying themselves, namely in an effort to curb child pornography and abuse. The law would also require mobile phone users to register using their real names. Cyberactivists launched a campaign with the hashtag #Code_Num and aFacebook page against the law shortly after a draft was posted to an official government website. The draft was later removed.MoroccoAnti-cybercrime draft lawoffending the King or the Monarchy, Islam, Morocco Territorial Integrity, public order, homeland security, necessities of public service, public policy54Media/Press/PublicationLegislationyes1.6May 12, 2014Dec 16, 2013https://www.digcit.org/2014/05/12/volume-1-6/https://www.digcit.org/ar/2014/05/12/131/https://www.Facebook.com/DesobeissanceElectroniquehttp://www.sgg.gov.ma/portals/0/AvantProjet/67/Avp_loi_67.13_Fr.pdf